Welcome, Guest
Username: Password:
  • Page:
  • 1

TOPIC: Slang English Lessons | Series 2

Must Know Slang Words 3 years 2 months ago #7572

  • Chuck OysterCafe
  • Chuck OysterCafe's Avatar Topic Author
  • Offline
  • Administrator
  • Administrator
  • Posts: 177
  • Karma: 1
  • Thank you received: 1
This is our second set of lessons targeted at teaching you the most common English and American slang words and phrases

In this series of lessons, we not only aim to help you become more familiar with the way people speak in more informal situations, but also aim to help you understand many of the slang words and phrases used in American and British TV shows, songs, and movies.


영어 속어를 배우고 싶으세요? 그렇다면 이 강의를 확인해 보세요!


Best English & American Slang Words Lesson 1: jabroni | tapped out | dapper | minted

jabroni (n.): an obnoxious or rude person; a loser
Note: The word ‘jabroni’ is a mild insult which can be used when someone does something stupid. It is sometimes used between male friends as a term of endearment.
Examples
1. Look at this jabroni trying to park his car. Do you think he’s drunk?
2. You’re a real jabroni, aren’t you?
3. Situation: Two friends talking on the phone about their weekend plans.
Carl: What time is the party this weekend?
Steve: You dopey jabroni; the party is next week.

tapped out (adj.): to have no money; skint (slang); flat broke
Examples
1. I am completely tapped out after my trip away.
2. I would lend you some money but I’m completely tapped out myself.
3. Situation: Two friends talking about money
Josh: Can you spot me $100, please? I’m totally tapped out this month.
Queena: Sure, but I need it back by Friday.
Josh: No problem. You’re an angel!

dapper (adj.): to look good (used to talk about a stylish man); well-dressed (man)
Note: It sounds better to say ‘dappa’
Examples
1. I think George Clooney is still a dapper looking dude.
2. Who is the most dapper celebrity in Korea?
3. Situation: Three friends are talking about their friend at a party.
Dave: Look, there’s Chris.
Branden: Better late than never, I suppose.
Josh: True! But what is that jabroni wearing?
Branden: I know, right? I’ve never seen him look so dapper.

minted (adj.): rich; to have a lot of money
Note: ‘minted’ is used more commonly in British English
Examples
1. That guy looks minted!
2. Bill can always look dapper because he’s minted.
3. Situation: Two friends talking about money.
Queena: Look, I really need that money back I lent you. I’m not minted, you know?
Josh: Honestly, I’d love to pay you back, but I’m tapped out at the moment.

Communication Tip: Draw attention to something important or something frustrating (Look,…)
look (exclamation): used to draw someone’s attention to something (usually something which upsets or shocks you); used to draw attention to a statement or opinion (often used to show frustration)

* Look, I just don’t want to date you. I’m sorry.
* Look, the guy is a total jabroni. Why are you even friends with him?
* Look, if you don’t sit down I am going to get angry.
* Look, I can’t pay you back yet, I’m tapped out until payday.

Vocabulary
term of endearment (n.): a phrase to show you are close to someone
dopey (adj.): unintelligent; slow to understand
spot (v. informal); to lend something
mint (n.): the place money is made
pay back (v.): to return borrowed money to someone
payday (n.): the day you get paid from your company
better late than never (exp.): it is better for someone or something to be late than never to arrive or be completed
You are an angel (exp.): said to someone who has done you a big favor (note: men don’t usually say this to other men)

OysterCafe.com - Keeping English Real!
영어 수업 - 오이스터카페


Check us out on Instagram!

Check out a sample of our lessons on YouTube!
Attachments:

Please Log in to join the conversation.

Last edit: by Chuck OysterCafe.

Must Know Slang Words 3 years 2 months ago #7574

  • Chuck OysterCafe
  • Chuck OysterCafe's Avatar Topic Author
  • Offline
  • Administrator
  • Administrator
  • Posts: 177
  • Karma: 1
  • Thank you received: 1
Best English Slang Words Lesson 2: sesh | gnarly | frickin’ | dad bod



sesh (n.): a shortening of the word session
Note: The term ‘sesh’ is often used when talking about gym sessions, study sessions, and therapy.
Examples
1. I really enjoyed my surfing sesh this morning.
2. That sesh was awesome! I really like this professor.
3. Situation: Two people talking about the gym
Chuck: Did you hit the gym for your sesh today?
Larry: Of course!
Chuck: How was it?
Larry: Fan-frickin-tastic, as usual.

gnarly (adj.): awesome (usually used to talk about someone’s ability in an extreme sport such as surfing, skateboarding, skiing etc.); used to describe a bad wound or cut etc.
Note: This word is a little dated, but can still be used for fun.
Examples
1. That really is a gnarly gash you have on your leg; you should see a doctor ASAP.
2. My brother can do some gnarly tricks on his skateboard.
3. Situation: Two coworkers discussing BMX riding.
Sally: Did you know Dave rides a BMX?
Harry: (Ha ha) Yes, everyone knows that. He’s the most gnarly dude in the office.
Note: most gnarly/gnarliest = both are OK.

fricking / frickin’ / fricken (adj): used to express frustration, anger, or annoyance; used to emphasize something (can be something good or something bad)
Note: ‘Frick’ can be used as a reaction to pain (e.g. Frick! I hit my thumb with a hammer.) or to show frustration (e.g. Frick! That jabroni stole my car park.)
Examples
1. My boss is a frickin’ clown! Why can’t he communicate better?
2. It is too frickin’ hot to go out; let’s just chill at home today.
3. Situation: Two people discussing movies.
Darryl: Have you seen Frozen 2?
Beth: Yeah, it’s fricking awesome! What’d you think?
Darryl: Yeah, it’s pretty gnarly.

Note: Want to learn how to communicate better in business? Join us and get access to over 500 English lessons . Also, check out this Business English lesson aimed at helping you understand effective business communication.

dad bod (n.): describing a slightly chubby body often seen in middle-aged men (bod = body)
Note: This term is sort of funny and sort of insulting – so don’t actually say someone has a dad bod unless you are joking with them.
Examples
1. Who is the UFC fighter with the dad bod?
2. I hit the gym every day, but I still have a dad bod.
3. Situation: Two women are talking about guys.
Sue: I used to like ripped guys, but now I prefer a guy with a bit of a dad bod.
Jin: I know what you’re saying. Gym guys are usually too superficial.
Sue: Exactly! Give me a guy with a dad bod and a fat stack in his wallet any day.
Jin: (Ha ha) You really are a gold digger, aren’t you!

Communication Tip: Add emphasis with the infix (---frickin’---)
An infix is a word element (similar to a suffix or prefix) that can be inserted into a longer word (The infix gets inserted before the syllable that receives the most stress, which is usually after the first syllable.) to intensify the meaning of that word. In English, slang is the only place infixes appear, with the most common infixes (without using a swear word) being ‘fricking’ and ‘bloody’ (although both of these words might be considered a little rude). A milder version you could use is ‘flaming’.

* This weather is un-frickin-believable.
* You have arrived? Halle-bloody-lujah!
* You look fan-fricking-tastic.
* Look, you are so un-fricken-educated; I’m actually bored of talking to you!

Warning: Only use this style of speaking around adults who you are very friendly with.

Vocabulary
chubby (adj.): a little bit fat
ripped (adj.): very fit looking
fat stack (n./slang): a lot of money (a stack of $100 notes)
session (n.): a period of time dedicated to one activity (e.g. study session)
swear words (n.): words used to insult; “bad” words
You can say that again (exp.): I agree with you 100%
hallelujah (exp.): used to express relief; word used to show praise or joy

OysterCafe.com - Keeping English Real!
영어 수업 - 오이스터카페


Check out a sample of our lessons on YouTube!
Attachments:

Please Log in to join the conversation.

Last edit: by Chuck OysterCafe.

Must Know Slang Words | gold digger / lit / floss / bonkers 3 years 2 months ago #7576

  • Chuck OysterCafe
  • Chuck OysterCafe's Avatar Topic Author
  • Offline
  • Administrator
  • Administrator
  • Posts: 177
  • Karma: 1
  • Thank you received: 1
Best English Slang Words Lesson 3: gold digger | lit | bonkers | floss



gold digger (n.): a person who wants to find a rich partner
Note: ‘Gold digger’ is often used to refer to a lady looking for a wealthy partner; however it can also be used to refer to men looking for a wealthy partner.
Examples
1. Do you think she is a gold digger?
2. I would hate to be rich; so many gold diggers after you.
3. I could never be a gold digger.

lit (adj.): describing something good or enjoyable; great quality
Note: ‘Lit’ also means ‘drunk’
Examples
1. That party was lit.
2. I heard your professor is pretty lit.
3. Situation: Two people are talking about a kick-ass DJ they saw.
Freddy: That DJ we saw last night was lit.
Lisa: Yeah, I knew he would be.
Freddy: I actually heard he sometimes throws free parties to get media attention.
Lisa: Really? That’s bonkers.
Freddy: For real!

bonkers (adj.): crazy (good crazy and bad crazy); not smart; acting silly
Note: The word ‘bonkers’ is more common in British English. Make sure you stress this word when you say it.
Examples
1. Seriously, your dancing is totally bonkers.
2. That idea is bonkers; we can’t expect the boss to go for that.
3. Situation: Two guys are in a café talking about a party they went to.
JiMin: That party last night was bonkers.
Kenji: For real! And you were pretty lit, were you not?
JiMin: (Ha ha) I was indeed.
Kenji: I’m surprised you don’t have a hangover.
JiMin: I do! I’m only meeting you to get coffee.

floss (v.): to show off your style or possessions (generally on SNS)
Note: The term ‘floss’ comes from a dance of the same name made popular thanks to Katty Perry’s ‘backpack kid’ (an Instagram star) and his awesome dance moves.
Examples
1. He just flosses on SNS to get girls to follow him.
2. Young people like to floss on Instagram anytime they get the chance.
3. I’m tired of meeting Dave. All he does is take selfies so he can floss on Instagram to get more followers.

Communication Tip: Express purpose or reason (...to get…/ for + (somebody))

You can use ‘…to get…’ to explain the reason why someone is doing something:
* You're studying at OysterCafe to get better at communicating in English.
* I need to hit the gym every day to get in shape for summer.

You can also use ‘for + somebody’ to explain that you are doing an action to benefit or help someone else:
* We make these lessons for you to get better at English.
* She flosses on SNS for her fans.

Note: In more formal English, people generally use ‘in order to’ or ‘so as to’ to express their purpose.
* We make new lessons each week in order to help you learn English.
* She studies really hard in order to impress her professor.

Vocabulary
to go for (exp.): support; agree to do
hangover (n.): sick and sleepy feeling after drinking a lot of alcohol
kick-ass/kickass (adj. informal): awesome; of great quality
possession (n.): something you own
follower (n.): someone who follows or supports someone else

OysterCafe.com - Keeping English Real!
영어 수업 - 오이스터카페


Check out a sample of our lessons on YouTube!
Attachments:

Please Log in to join the conversation.

Last edit: by Chuck OysterCafe.

Must Know Slang Words 3 years 1 month ago #7579

  • Chuck OysterCafe
  • Chuck OysterCafe's Avatar Topic Author
  • Offline
  • Administrator
  • Administrator
  • Posts: 177
  • Karma: 1
  • Thank you received: 1
This Lesson's Slang Words: flex | bougie | schmuck | bad boy

flex (v.): to show off your possessions style (similar to – floss)
Note: The verb ‘flex’ traditionally means to tense your muscles.
Examples
1. When you flex on SNS, your mom gets angry.
2. Look at this jabroni flexing next to his Ferrari.
3. Situation: Two friends are shopping for sunglasses
Andy: Those shades are very bougie.
Jane: They are frickin' awesome! I think I will buy them so I can show them off at the beach.
Andy: Damn! You are always just buying stuff to flex, hey?

bougie (adj.): describing something expensive or luxurious; someone from a higher class
Note: this word comes from the word ‘bourgeois’ – meaning middle-class
Examples
1. If we go to this bougie club, we will be able to use our selfies to flex on SNS.
2. This bar is very bougie; I bet it’s expensive.
3. Situation: Two friends talking about getting massages.
Yemi: I have decided to splurge a little and get a massage.
Tim: Oh, very bougie. I don’t get massages because when I do, I always feel shy.

schmuck (n.): a foolish or contemptible person; someone who gets fooled easily
Note: ‘Schmuck’ is a rather soft insult that is often uses between male friends.
Examples
1. If this schmuck wins, he’ll buy us all dinner.
2. Your brother is such a schmuck.
3. Situation: Three friends are making dinner plans.
Ollie: What are you schmucks doing for dinner?
Dan: I think we should hit that new restaurant down the street. I hear it’s pretty lit.
Ollie: Hmm…It’s a bit too bougie for me.
Fred: Then, how about we hit up the burger joint you like? I mean, since you are too tight to drop any of your hard earned cash on a nice dinner.

bad boy (n.): a thing that is regarded as extremely impressive or effective; an awesome thing
Note: Often used in an ironic way
Examples
1. Check out that bad boy! (Situation: Looking at an old car. – used ironically)
2. These bad boys are rad! (Situation: Talking about a pair of new sneakers.)
3. Look at that bad boy! I really want to splurge, but I’m totally skint.

Communication Tip: Talking about general truths and predictable results

Zero conditional: One thing happens and because of this something else happens.
Use ‘if’ or ‘when’ to talk about general truths, scientific facts and the predictable results of particular actions.
Examples
* When this schmuck wins, he celebrates by dancing like a fool. .
* When she flexes her bougie items on Instagram, all her followers go crazy!
* If she hits the gym, she will get fit.
* Situation: A salesman hoping to sell a Bugatti La Voiture noire – the most expensive car ever made.
Salesman: If I sell this bad boy, I’ll be minted.
Friend: Sure, but do you have a buyer lined up?

Vocabulary
splurge (v.): spend money on fun or something luxurious (often expensive)
shades (n. slang): sunglasses
I bet (exp.): I am sure
contemptible (adj.): despicable; detestable (about someone you think is below you)
skint (adj. slang): to have no money; broke
hit up (v. slang): to go to a café, bar, or restaurant
tight (adj. informal); describing someone who does not like to spend money
line up (v. informal): to be ready to buy

OysterCafe.com - Keeping English Real!
영어 수업 - 오이스터카페


Check out a sample of our lessons on YouTube!

Please Log in to join the conversation.

Last edit: by Chuck OysterCafe.

Slang English Lessons | Series 2 3 years 1 month ago #7586

  • Chuck OysterCafe
  • Chuck OysterCafe's Avatar Topic Author
  • Offline
  • Administrator
  • Administrator
  • Posts: 177
  • Karma: 1
  • Thank you received: 1
Best English Slang Words Lesson 6: dough | skint | make bank | skrilla

This lesson is all about the green! Yes, we are going to teach you some slang words related to money.

이번 속어 강의에서는 돈에 관한 새로운 표현을 4가지 알려드립니다.

dough (n.): money
Note: Dough is used to make ‘bread’ (bread was/is a staple for many families). ‘Bread’ is also a slang term for money.
Examples
1. Do you have any dough on you?
2. How much dough do you make a year?
3. Situation: A guy talking to his fiancé about money.
Paul: So, how much dough are you making at your new job?
Ellen: What? Are you serious? I can’t tell you that. (Laughs)
Paul: Of course you can, I’m your future husband.
Ellen: Well, my future husband, I heard that you are going to buy me a huge diamond ring.
Paul: (Laughing) And where would I get the dough for that?

skint (adj.): to have no money; broke; tapped out (slang)
Examples
1. I wish I wasn’t always so skint.
2. Why are you always skint?
3. Situation: Two friends talking.
Jeff: I heard you lost your wallet.
Joe: Sort of. I got drunk and left it in the taxi.
Jeff: You really are a jabroni, aren’t you?
Jeff: (Laughing) Indeed…and a skint one at that.



make bank (phrasal verb.): to earn a lot of money
Note: This phrase is often used when talking about large sums of money (e.g. Michael Jordan still makes bank with his Air Jordan brand.)
Examples
1. Mary must be making bank at the moment; she’s always splashing the cash on fancy dinners and then flexing on Instagram with her selfies.
2. I really need to make bank this year.
3. Situation: Two friends talking about making money and business.
Ted: I heard you are starting to make bank with your business.
Jill: Well, not make bank, but I’m making a few bucks.
Ted: happy to hear it. So, how about spotting me few bucks until payday, I’m skint.

skrilla (n. informal): money
Note: Only use skrilla in informal situations or with people you know as it sounds like slang.
Examples
1. I heard you have a new job and are now starting to make some serious skrilla. Congrats!
2. How much skrilla you got on ya? Think you can spot me twenty bucks?
3. Situation: Two people are talking about money.
Buddy: How much skrilla do you have on you?
Frank: Not a dime; I’m totally skint.
Buddy: Oh yeah, I heard you got canned yesterday.

Communication Tip: I heard …
The phrase ‘I heard…’ can be used to talk about recent events or occurrences you know about, but you don’t know exactly how you know about these things (or how you know is not important). ‘I heard…’ can also be used in situations where you are talking in a general sense, and saying where you heard the information is irrelevant or not important.

I heard…’ = ‘I know that…’ or ‘I am pretty sure that…

* I heard your boss is a real schmuck.
* I heard you are pretty skint at the moment. Do you want me to spot you shekels?
* I heard you are making some pretty serious skrilla at the moment.
* I heard you have a new girlfriend, and she’s a model at that!

Vocabulary
drop (v. slang): to spend money
can (v. slang): to fire someone from their job; to be fired
bucks (plural noun/slang): money
spot (v. informal): loan
serious (adj. informal): a large amount of; a lot
staple (n.): a main or important element of something, especially of a diet
at that (exp.): in addition; furthermore (often used to add emphasis)
shekel (n. slang): Israeli currency; slang for money

OysterCafe.com - Keeping English Real!
영어 수업 - 오이스터카페


Check us out on Instagram!

Check out a sample of our lessons on YouTube!
Attachments:

Please Log in to join the conversation.

Last edit: by Chuck OysterCafe.

Slang English Lessons: thingamajig | own | funky | can 1 year 7 months ago #7659

  • Chuck OysterCafe
  • Chuck OysterCafe's Avatar Topic Author
  • Offline
  • Administrator
  • Administrator
  • Posts: 177
  • Karma: 1
  • Thank you received: 1
In this English slang lesson you will learn the following terms: thingamajig | can | funky | own (someone/something)

thingamajig (n.): describing a thing you don’t know or can’t remember the name of; gizmo
Note: Other words you can use include ‘thingy’, ‘doovalacky’, and ‘whatchamacallit’.
Examples
1. Can you pass me that thingamajig, please?
2. Where is the thingamajig that you used to fix the boat?
3. Situation: Two people are cooking.
Mary: Can you pass me the…um…that, um…
Grant: What? The lid?
Mary: Not the lid; the thingamajig next to the lid.
Grant: The peeler?
Mary: (Laughing) Yes, the peeler. Oh, I must be getting old. I forgot what it was called.

can (v.): to fire someone from their job; to be fired
Note: Other words with the same meaning include ‘sack’, ‘fire’, and ‘axe’.
Examples
1. I was going to can Bill today, but I just couldn’t do it.
2. I was about to can Jeff, but suddenly he made a huge sale and we all made bank.
3. Situation: Two people talking about losing their jobs.
John: I heard the company is not making any money and that we could all be canned soon.
Paul: What!? You heard that? Those schmucks can’t can all of us, can they?

funky (adj.): describing a strange or weird situation or behavior; describing a bad smell or feeling
Note: ‘Funky’ can be used to describe most things that are bad; 'funky' can also be used to describe something cool or awesome
Examples
1. Damn! Your feet smell so funky.
2. That dude over there looks a bit sus to me. There’s just something a little funky about him.
3. Situation: A lady is talking to her boyfriend about his poor cooking skills.
YuJin: Oh my God! What is that funky smell?
Troy: Sorry. I was practicing my cooking, but I messed up again.
YuJin: (Ha ha) I knew you would practice cooking today, I just didn’t know you’d mess it up again.

own (v.): beating someone at something; to be defeated
Note: Often used as a phrase – “got owned”
Examples
1. I knew she was good at this game, but I didn’t know I’d get owned so badly.
2. I just got owned by that kid over there in a game of chess.
3. Situation: Two friends talking about a game of basketball.
Susie: Are you sure you want to play? You know you always get owned.
Gerry: Look, you might usually own me, but today, I’m going to own you.

Communication Tip: Talking about something you predicated or planned in the past

Sometimes we plan or predict something in the past which needs to be mentioned at the time of speaking. This style of speaking is generally used to talk about plans, predictions, and events that did (and didn’t) happen.

Check out the following examples to see how it is done:

* I knew he would get owned by her; she’s the best player here.
In the past = predicted he would lose | Present = He lost because she is the best
* I was going to go for a run today, but I feel a bit funky.
In the past = I planned to go running | Present = I feel a little sick so I won’t go
* I knew I’d be canned today.
In the past = I predicted I would lose my job | Present = I got fired from my job
* Sorry I didn’t say ‘hi’ before; I was meeting the boss at 9 a.m. and was running late.
In the past = I ignored you | Present = I am explaining why I ignored you.

Vocabulary
mess up (v.): to make a mistake
predict (v.): to guess what will happen in the future
ignore (v.): to avoid or not talk to someone

OysterCafe.com - Keeping English Real!
영어 수업 - 오이스터카페


Check out a sample of our lessons on YouTube!

Please Log in to join the conversation.

  • Page:
  • 1
Time to create page: 0.138 seconds
Powered by Kunena Forum