Welcome, Guest
Username: Password:
  • Page:
  • 1
  • 2

TOPIC: English Lessons About Food and Drink | 음식과 음료에 대한 영어 수업

English Lessons About Food & Drink | 음식과 음료에 대한 영어 수업 3 years 1 month ago #7518

  • Chuck OysterCafe
  • Chuck OysterCafe's Avatar Topic Author
  • Offline
  • Administrator
  • Administrator
  • Posts: 177
  • Karma: 1
  • Thank you received: 1
English Lessons About Food and Drink | 음식과 음료에 대한 영어 수업

Being able to speak about the flavors and textures of food and drink is very important in many social situations. From describing the food you ate at a Michelin star restaurant, to talking about your grandma’s homemade kimchi stew, these free English lessons should help you become more confident when discussing food and drink in a range of different situations.



음식의 맛을 표현하는 방법은 다양한 상황에서 요긴하게 사용됩니다. 미슐랭 레스토랑 음식이나 할머니가 손수 만드신 김치찌개가 어땠는지, 이 강의를 들으시고 더 자신 있게 얘기해 보세요.

OysterCafe.com - Keeping English Real!
영어 수업 - 오이스터카페
Attachments:

Please Log in to join the conversation.

Last edit: by Chuck OysterCafe.

English Lessons About Food & Drink | 음식과 음료에 대한 영어 수업 3 years 1 month ago #7519

  • Chuck OysterCafe
  • Chuck OysterCafe's Avatar Topic Author
  • Offline
  • Administrator
  • Administrator
  • Posts: 177
  • Karma: 1
  • Thank you received: 1
5 Ways To Describe Good Food & Drink | 음식의 좋은 맛을 묘사하는 단어 5개

Describing everything you enjoy eating (or drinking) as “delicious” is fine, but it can be rather boring and sound a little robotic. In this English lesson we will give you five key words/expressions you can use when describing food that tastes or looks delicious.

fantastic (adj.): of good quality; wonderful
1. This hamburger tastes fantastic. Did you make it from scratch?
2. Have you tried the new burger joint? The food is fantastic.
3. A few days ago I ate a taco that tasted fantastic.

to die for (exp.): of the best quality or flavor
Note: The idea is that something is so good that you would give up your life just to have it.
1. Her cooking is to die for.
2. I heard the pasta at the new Italian joint is to die for.
3. My mother’s Korean cooking is to die for.

scrumptious (adj.): to have an extremely good flavor (often used to talk about homemade food or comfort food)
1. The banana cake at this café is scrumptious; you really should try it.
2. Wow! You made this from scratch? It’s so scrumptious!
3. Fresh bagels with cream cheese are so scrumptious.

delectable (adj.): describing food that looks or tastes extremely good (often used when talking about food that might be considered exclusive, delicate, or made by a talented chef or pastry cook etc.)
1. All of these cakes look so delectable; I don’t know which one to choose.
2. The meal was really delectable. Thank you for inviting us to dinner.
3. Wow!...These handmade chocolates are delectable.

Wow! (exclamation): used to express joy or pleasure (generally used in more informal situations)
Note: Make sure you pause for about 1 second before you say ‘wow’.
1. This steak tastes… wow!
2. Wow! This steak is gooood! (Note: Exaggerated pronunciation of “good”)
3. (Sipping coffee) Wow! Just divine.



Bonus Vocabulary
joint (n. informal): café or restaurant; someone’s house/apartment
divine (adj.): wonderful, delightful; great flavor
make from scratch (exp.): to make something from the beginning/start using fresh ingredients



OysterCafe.com - Keeping English Real!
영어 수업 - 오이스터카페
Attachments:

Please Log in to join the conversation.

Last edit: by Chuck OysterCafe.

English Lessons About Food & Drink | 음식과 음료에 대한 영어 수업 3 years 1 month ago #7520

  • Chuck OysterCafe
  • Chuck OysterCafe's Avatar Topic Author
  • Offline
  • Administrator
  • Administrator
  • Posts: 177
  • Karma: 1
  • Thank you received: 1
In this English lesson, you will learn another 5 ways you can describe food and drink that tastes delicious. | 이번 강의에서는 맛있는 음식을 설명하는 5가지 방법에 대해 알아보겠습니다.

finger-licking (adj.): food that is so good that you want to lick your fingers after eating it to prolong the enjoyment and flavor (Note: often collocated with ‘good’)
1. This chicken is finger-licking good.
2. That cake looks finger-licking good.
3. My mom’s cooking is finger-licking.

flavorful (adj.): foods/drinks that are full of flavor (often as a result of herbs and spices)
1. This food is so flavorful. How’d you make it?
2. Ben really knows how to cook a flavorful curry; I hope he invites us for dinner soon.
3. Situation: A man praising his wife’s cooking to his female.
Man: I really at like a king last night.
Friend: Really? Why?
Man: My wonderful wife cooked the most flavorful meal for dinner; it was just divine.

appetizing (adj.): an enjoyable flavor or aroma; tasty or appealing
1. These cakes look really appetizing.
2. That cake looks rather appetizing; and the smell is heavenly.
3. Something smells appetizing; what is it?

delightful (adj.): an enjoyable flavor or aroma; appealing to the senses (often used about food and drink that has a light flavor or texture)
1. This meal was really delightful. Thank you very much.
2. This wine is rather delightful. Where is it from?
3. The café across the street sells the most delightful little cookies.

extraordinary (adj.): of the highest quality; wonderful; amazing
1. His food is just extraordinary.
2. What an extraordinary flavor! Where did you learn to cook?
3. This food is truly extraordinary! It truly is fit for a king.



Communication Tip: Key Adverbs
truly: to the fullest degree; genuinely or properly; honestly
rather: to a certain or significant extent or degree; surprisingly good or bad
very: to a large degree; a lot
really: used to add strength or sincerity to a statement or opinion; genuinely
just: exactly; totally

Bonus Vocabulary
Fit for a king/queen (exp.): to describe food/drink of the highest quality; to describe a restaurant or venue that is luxurious or very opulent

OysterCafe.com - Keeping English Real!
영어 수업 - 오이스터카페
Attachments:

Please Log in to join the conversation.

Last edit: by Chuck OysterCafe.

English Lessons About Food & Drink | 음식과 음료에 대한 영어 수업 3 years 1 month ago #7522

  • Chuck OysterCafe
  • Chuck OysterCafe's Avatar Topic Author
  • Offline
  • Administrator
  • Administrator
  • Posts: 177
  • Karma: 1
  • Thank you received: 1
In this lesson you will learn 5 ways you can describe food and drink that tastes bad in English.



bland (adj.): lacking flavor or taste; boring to eat or drink
1. I’m really sorry, but this soup is rather bland. Do you have any salt?
2. My diet is really bland; just chicken and broccoli for every meal.
3. Hospital food is really bland!

gross (adj.): bad flavor; food or drink that is not enjoyable to eat or look at; repulsive
1. Your cooking looks gross. How’s it taste?
2. Some people think eating insects is gross, but I personally think they are scrumptious.
3. Situation: A child complaining about eating vegetables.
Child: This broccoli tastes like dirt! Why do I have to eat it?
Parent: I know you think it tastes gross, but it won’t kill you. And you have to eat it because I said.

off (adj.): food or drink that is no longer fresh (often unsafe to eat/drink)
1. (Spitting out milk) Yuck! This milk is off. Who put it in the fridge?
2. You should never eat off meat.
3. I still eat cereal even if it is off; it won’t kill me.

stale (adj.): food (often baked bread and cakes etc.) that is no longer fresh
1. This bread is really stale.
2. I can’t believe the bakery sells stale bread; even if it is half price.
3. Situation: A customer complaining to the baker about his bread.
Customer; I bought this bread yesterday and it is already stale.
Baker: I’m sorry to hear that. Did you keep it wrapped in the bag?
Customer: Actually, no. I left it sitting on the bench unwrapped all night.

disgusting (adj.): a very bad taste or flavor; terrible to look at, smell, or taste
1. My God! This cake looks disgusting! Who made it?
2. Are you trying to kill me? This pasta is disgusting! Is it off?
3. This is the grossest thing I’ve ever tasted. It tastes like poison.

Communication Tip: Making Comparisons
tastes/looks/smells/feels/sounds + like + noun
To make comparisons, use verbs related to the senses followed by like and a noun.
Examples
* It tastes like poison.
* This broccoli tastes like dirt!
* It smells like heaven.
* It sounds like a feast.



OysterCafe.com - Keeping English Real!
영어 수업 - 오이스터카페
Attachments:

Please Log in to join the conversation.

Last edit: by Super User.

English Lessons About Food & Drink | 음식과 음료에 대한 영어 수업 3 years 1 month ago #7523

  • Chuck OysterCafe
  • Chuck OysterCafe's Avatar Topic Author
  • Offline
  • Administrator
  • Administrator
  • Posts: 177
  • Karma: 1
  • Thank you received: 1
Learn how to describe the texture of food in English. | 이 짧은 강의에서 여러분은 음식을 묘사하는 단어들을 몇 가지 배우게 됩니다.



chewy (adj.): describing a food that needs to be chewed a lot (e.g. dried fruit, jerky)
1. These noodles are really chewy.
2. Since I wear braces on my teeth I can’t eat chewy food.
3. Traditional Korean candy is rather chewy, isn’t it?

buttery (adj.): a smooth and creamy texture (e.g. butter chicken curry; pumpkin soup); a soft and moist flavor (often due to the presence of butter)
1. I love buttery soup in winter, especially if it’s pumpkin soup.
2. Have you tried the new Indian restaurant in Gangnam? The curry is so buttery.
3. This custard is delectable. How did you get it so buttery?

flaky (adj.): a light, layered texture that often falls apart when being eaten
1. The pastry was so flaky it was difficult to truly enjoy.
2. Why does flaky food have to be so messy?
3. Situation: Two people talking about the best way to cook flaky fish.
Ben: I think I am going to fry this fish in a pan for dinner with a nice buttery sauce.
Mary: You can fry it if you like, but it’s a little on the flaky side. It might be best to bake it.

gooey (adj.); a dense, sticky liquid inside a solid food (often used to talk about puddings)
1. I love gooey pudding, especially sticky date pudding.
2. Most chocolate bars containing caramel are a little on the gooey side, don’t you think?
3. Do you like gooey desserts? Because, if you do, we should go to the café near your house and get a warm chocolate pudding. Those things are to die for!

tough (adj.): hard to chew or cut (often used to describe meat)
1. My God! This steak is so tough! You can’t even chew it!
2. I think this bread is stale; It’s too tough to chew.
3. The BBQ was great fun, but the meat the chef cooked was a little on the tough side.

Communication Tip: On the (adjective) side
on the + adjective + side (expression): tending to be similar to the adjective; not entirely, but a little.
Examples
* The fish is on the flaky side. (i.e. The fish is a little bit flaky.)
* The bread is on the stale side. (i.e. The bread is a touch stale.)
* Chocolate’s containing caramel are a little on the gooey side.
* The steak was a little on the tough side.
* The meal was a little on the expensive side.

OysterCafe.com - Keeping English Real!
영어 수업 - 오이스터카페

Attachments:

Please Log in to join the conversation.

Last edit: by Chuck OysterCafe.

English Lessons About Food & Drink | 음식과 음료에 대한 영어 수업 3 years 1 month ago #7527

  • Chuck OysterCafe
  • Chuck OysterCafe's Avatar Topic Author
  • Offline
  • Administrator
  • Administrator
  • Posts: 177
  • Karma: 1
  • Thank you received: 1
In this English lesson, you will learn 5 more words or expressions you can use to describe the feel and texture of food. | 이 짧은 강의에서 여러분은 음식을 묘사하는 단어들을 몇 가지 배우게 됩니다.

tender (adj.): a soft texture that is easy to chew (usually used to talk about meat)
1. Wow! This steak is really tender! How’d you cook it?
2. This chicken is so tender and juicy. Compliments to the chef.
3. Situation: A man cooking for his girlfriend.
Boyfriend: Tonight I want to make a mango salad and grill some fish.
Girlfriend: Great idea! The mangoes we bought are really tender and juicy.
Boyfriend: Exactly. And this fish is light and flaky.
Girlfriend: It sounds delightful.

sticky (adj.): a soft, gluey texture (usually used to describe sweet foods or desserts)
1. His homemade caramel is rather sticky, isn’t it?
2. I love sticky food. The texture reminds me of my childhood.
3. Situation: A waiter offering the guest dessert.
Waiter: Tonight the chef has prepared a sticky toffee pudding with fresh cream.
Guest: It sounds mouthwatering, but is there anything else? My dentist told me I’m not supposed to eat sweet food

juicy (adj.): a solid food that contains liquid; succulent (often used to describe fruit or meat)
1. I thought these oranges were supposed to be juicy! They have no juice whatsoever.
2. I wish I knew how to cook steak so it remained juicy.
3. Situation: A fruit shop owner is trying to sell his fruit to passing customers.
Grocer: 3 mangoes for $10! Get 3 sweet and juicy mangoes for $10! Get them now!
Customer: I’ll take 6, please.
Grocer: Wonderful! You won’t be sorry. The juiciest mangoes I’ve ever tasted.



crunchy (adj.): having a firm, crisp texture (makes a ‘crunching’ sound when eaten)
1. I just love fresh bread in the morning, especially if the crust is still crunchy.
2. I really hate the little crunchy bits you find in popcorn; they get caught in my teeth.
3. Situation: A server talking to a customer.
Customer: Is this pastry supposed to be light and crunchy or soft and chewy?
Server: It is supposed to be light and crunchy. Why? Is something wrong?
Customer: It’s no big deal, but it’s soft and chewy and tastes a little stale.

fluffy (adj.): a light and airy texture (e.g. marshmallow, fluffy scrambled eggs)
1. You really do cook the most delectable scrambled eggs. How do you get them so fluffy?
2. I love fluffy pancakes in the morning. The smell alone is mouthwatering.
3. What’s the secret to making fluffy scones?

Supposed to be…
supposed to (idiom): be expected to do/be something; meant to do/be something
* Are these pancakes supposed to be cold?
* Is the steak supposed to be tough?
* The pastry is supposed to be light and crunchy.
* The cake is supposed to be fluffy.
* The mango was supposed to be juicy, but it wasn’t.

Bonus Words
mouthwatering (adj.): to arouse one’s appetite; tantalizingly delicious or appealing
no big deal (exp.): not a problem; not something that causes concern or anger etc.
compliments to the chef (exp.): said as a way of praising the person who cooked the food

OysterCafe.com - Keeping English Real!
영어 수업 - 오이스터카페

Attachments:

Please Log in to join the conversation.

Last edit: by Chuck OysterCafe.
  • Page:
  • 1
  • 2
Time to create page: 0.325 seconds
Powered by Kunena Forum