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TOPIC: Important Verbs For English Fluency Series 2

Important Verbs For English Fluency Series 2 1 month 3 weeks ago #7567

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Useful English Verbs Series 2: Push

The verb ‘push’ is a very versatile verb. In this free English lesson we are going to give you several examples of how the verb ‘push’ can be used in various contexts.



Verb Definition: Push
1. to exert force on (someone or something); press (e.g. push a button)
2. to use force to pass people (moving them aside with your hands)
3. cause to increase or rise (often related to price)
4. make an aggressive effort to sell; to pressure someone to buy
5. to compel or make someone do something
Idioms / Expressions / Phrasal Verbs
6. push through: to not give up; persevere through hardship
7. push (someone) out: to pressure someone to leave a group or company
8. push for (something): to continue to ask for something or to try to make something happen because you think it is important

Examples
* Stop pushing me! (1/2)
* The drought really pushed the prices of fruit up. (3)
* Just push past them; we don’t have time to wait in line. (2)
* The teacher pushed him to do his homework. (5)
* The sales staff are really pushing that new scent, aren’t they? (4)
* Why don’t you keep pushing for a promotion? You deserve it! (8.)
* I felt like my company was trying to push me out. (7)
* You need to push through the pain and just get the job done. (6)
* What pushed up the prices of oil? (3)
* You need to push that button to turn on the radio. (1)

Communication Tip – For Necessary or Mandatory Actions (Need to…)
* You need to do your homework.
* You need to exercise to stay healthy.
* You need to eat less sugar if you want to lose weight.
* You need to keep pushing until you land the job you want.

Bonus Vocabulary
drought (n.): a period of no rain; very dry ground as a result of no rain
line (n.): a row of people waiting for something; queue
scent (n.): perfume; cologne
get the job done (idiom): complete the task or mission
healthy (adj.): to be in good health; to be free from sickness
land (v.): to secure a job or position; to catch or get something

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Useful English Verbs Series 2: Drive 3 weeks 6 days ago #7583

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Useful English Verbs Series 2: Drive

In this English lesson we are going to highlight and explain the most common ways the verb ‘drive’ can be used.

Verb Definition: Drive
1. to be in control of a motor vehicle
2. to propel by force; to give power to; to push with force
3. bring (someone) forcibly into a specified negative state
4. to hit or kick a ball with force
5. motivate, inspire, or urge to behave in a certain way
Idioms / Expressions / Phrasal Verbs
6. drive (someone) crazy: to annoy or upset someone
7. drive (something) home: to reiterate or emphasize a point or lesson
8. drive up/down: to make something increase or decrease quickly or intentionally (often used in relation to prices)

Examples
* You need to really focus on driving and stop looking at your smartphone. (1)
* I want you to really try your best and let your passion for English drive you! (5)
* You singing is really driving me crazy! I must ask you to kindly leave the room. (6)
* The doctor had no idea what was driving up the patient’s fever. (8.)
* The professor really tried hard to drive home her point. (7)
* What drives you to be the best? (5)
* Tiger Woods can drive the ball 285 yards. (4)
* The wind drove us off course. (2)
* Too much pressure at work drove him to tears. (3)
* I’m driving the staff hard because I really want our profits to more than triple. (5)

Note: There are several examples of split infinitives above, can you find them?

Communication Tip: Splitting Infinitives Can Make You Sound More Natural

Yes, many grammar teachers say you should never split infinitives (an infinitive is the dictionary form of a verb preceded by ‘to’ – e.g. to run, to walk, to read), but we are telling you it is commonly done by native English-speakers in casual conversation and certain forms of writing. Don’t believe us? Well, let’s prove it to you.

Two Famous Examples from Pop Culture

* To boldly go where no man has gone before. – Star Trek (1966 to present day)

* Go to Dr. Van Helsing, and ask him to kindly come here at once. – From Dracula by Bram Stoker (1897)

Why split an infinitive?
As we have mentioned, splitting an infinitive is not always viewed as an error in spoken word (or in certain forms of writing). In fact, splitting an infinitive can often make the meaning of a sentence clearer, and as such, sound more natural.

Examples for Learning Purposes

Split infinitive: I need to quickly stop at the bank.
Textbook Grammar: I quickly need to stop at the bank OR I need to stop at the bank quickly.

Split infinitive: The manager asked you to quietly wait for her in her office.
Textbook Grammar: The manager asked you to wait quietly for her in her office.

Note: All of the sentences above are perfectly fine to use in English.

Bonus Vocabulary
passion (n.): an intense desire or enthusiasm for something
off course (phrase): not following the intended route or direction
pressure (n.): stress or effect caused by external forces
boldly (adv.): to do in a confident and courageous way

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Last edit: by Chuck OysterCafe.

Useful English Verbs: Build 2 weeks 6 days ago #7585

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Important Verb: Build

The verb ‘build’ can be used in various contexts, and is especially prevalent in business contexts. In this lesson, we are going to help you understand a range of ways you can use the verb ‘build’ to sound a little more natural in many different situations.

Verb Definitions: Build
1. to construct using materials
2. to develop or grow a business
3. establish or grow something abstract (e.g. build a reputation)
4. based on or basis for (e.g. an argument based on lies)
5. to accumulate or grow steadily (e.g. build knowledge)
Idioms / Expressions / Phrasal Verbs
6. build on (something): to use something as a basis for further progress or development
7. build up (something): to make bigger or stronger
8. build bridges (idiom): to try to improve relations between people

Examples
* He has been trying to slowly save money each week to build (up) his savings. (5/7)
* Her research built on from other research in the field. (6)
* Don’t you think it’s time to build a bridge between you and your father? (8.)
* Don’t you think you should hit the gym and build up a little? (7)
* Isn’t it time you started trying to build your own business? (2)
* They will build the new house from recycled building materials. (1)
* Isn’t he building an argument based on logic? (4)
* Is he not trying to build his reputation as a scholar? (3)
* Does the government not think it is a good idea to build new schools? (1)
* Can’t you just start building your business with an investor? (2)
* Wouldn’t it be nice to build a strong network of business contacts? (5)

Communication Tip: Using Negative Questions
Did you notice the negative questions in the example sentences above? Why were they used?

Negative questions are used for two main reasons. First, to ask for confirmation of something you believe to be true, logical or obvious.
* Didn’t he build his business from the ground up? (= I think he built his business from the start)

And second, to make polite suggestions.
* Wouldn’t it be a great idea if you could start building your own business?

Note: There are two ways to ask negative questions, with a contraction (e.g. Isn’t it…?) and without a contraction (e.g. Is it not…?). In general, negative questions without a contraction are usually used in more formal situations.

• Isn’t he building a business? (Contraction = Auxiliary verb + n’t + subject)
• Is he not building a business? (No contraction = Auxiliary verb + subject + not)
• Didn’t he build his own house? (Contraction = Auxiliary verb + n’t + subject)
• Did he not build his own house? (No contraction = Auxiliary verb + subject + not)

Bonus Vocabulary
prevalent (adj.): commonly occurring
argument (n.): thesis; one’s reasoning aimed at demonstrating a truth or falsehood
reputation (n.): the way people see or evaluate someone or something
network (n.): people you have good relationships with and are in contact with
investor (n.): someone who provides money to a business in the hopes of making a return
from the ground up (exp.): from nothing to something; completely

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Important Verbs For English: Turn 2 weeks 5 days ago #7587

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Useful English Verbs Series 2: Turn

The verb ‘turn’ is rather versatile and has several different definitions and uses. Remember, just like all of our lessons, you don’t need to memorize all of the definitions; you simply need to focus on how the verb ‘turn’ is used in various situations.

Verb Definitions: Turn

1. to move around an axis or in a certain direction (e.g. Turn the car around.)
2. to manipulate the settings on a dial (e.g. Turn up the volume.)
3. to change direction of (e.g. The new CEO turned the business around.)
4. to change color, state, texture, character etc. (e.g. The leaves turned brown.)
5. to take advantage of something; to make use of (e.g. He turned his $1 into $1,000,000)
Idioms / Expressions / Phrasal Verbs
6. turn away (from someone/something): to avoid someone/something
7. turn down: reject an offer or opportunity
8. turn one’s back on (something/someone): to give up, forsake, ignore, or abandon

Examples
* Mary turned away from Ted because she is tired of his lies. (6)
* I suddenly turned red and started sweating. (4)
* Don’t you think it’s time to turn you anger into action? (5)
* Wouldn’t it be wonderful if our neighbor turned down his music? (2)
* Why did he turn down the position? (7)
* Could you please turn the car around? (1)
* I would really like to know how to turn my luck around. (3)
* He turned his back on a lucrative career so he could build his own business (8.)
* She had to turn away from the camp fire because she was too hot. (6)
* The investor turned down our request for funding. (7)
* Although he turned his back on his family in the past, he’s now trying to build bridges. (8.)

Communication Tip: Turn ‘A’ into ‘B’

Sometimes we have to make suggestions or give advice to people who are wasting a good opportunity, are in a situation where things are not going well, or just need your counsel or opinion. Check out the following examples to get a better understanding of how you can do this using the structure – turn ‘A’ into ‘B’.

Note: ‘A’ = opportunity, current situation / ‘B’ = your suggestion or advice

* Don’t you think it’s time to turn your good education into a good career?
* I think you should turn your negative attitude into a more positive one.
* Bill, it’s time to turn your love of fashion into a business.
* Why don’t you turn your love of books into a really cool book club?
* You should turn all of your old stuff into money by selling it online.

Bonus Vocabulary
counsel (n.): advice or opinion on matters and concerns
lucrative (adj.): to produce great wealth; to make money
attitude (n.): a way of thinking or feeling
position (n.): an offer of employment; a job or role within a company
career (n.): a job someone has for an extended period of time; professional work

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