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TOPIC: Using English Quantifiers: 수량사를 사용하는 법을 공부해 봅시다

Using English Quantifiers: 수량사를 사용하는 법을 공부해 봅시다. 3 years 3 months ago #7486

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This forum will be dedicated to helping you learn how to use quantifiers.

Quantifiers are a type of determiner denoting imprecise quantity. They modify nouns or pronouns and answer the questions “How much?" and "How many?"

수량사는 정확하지 않은 양을 표시하는 한정사입니다. 수량사는 명사 혹은 대명사를 꾸며주고, “How much?" 나 "How many?"의 대답이 될 수도 있습니다.

Quantifiers are commonly used when:
a) the speaker does not want to be precise for some reason,
b) being precise does not add to the key message, or
c) the exact number of something is not known or irrelevant.

Common Quantifiers: some/any, much, many, a lot, a few, several, enough

수량사가 흔히 사용되는 상황:
a) 화자가 부정확한 양을 말하고 싶을 때
b) 정확하게 말할 필요가 없을 때
c) 정확한 수를 모르거나, 양이 상황에 무관할 때

가장 많이 사용되는 수량사: some/any, much, many, a lot, a few, several, enough

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Quantifiers: A few | few | a little | little 3 years 3 months ago #7487

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Learn how to use the following quantifiers: a few / few / a little / little

Remember, quantifiers are commonly used when:
a) the speaker does not want to be precise for some reason,
b) being precise does not add to the key message, or
c) the exact number of something is not known or irrelevant.

Quantifiers: A few / few / a little / little
Few (not many) and little (not much) imply a quantity which is relatively small
A few and a little imply a relatively small quantity, but possibly more than one expected
Few and a few are used with countable nouns (always in the plural).
Little and a little are used with uncountable nouns (always in the plural)

Examples
1. Few of my friends were at the party, so I was a little disappointed.
2. A few of my friends came to the party, so I was rather happy.
3. I had little chance to talk to my wife yesterday; that made me a little sad.
4. My previous company didn’t pay well and provided few perks.
5. I only want a little milk in my tea, please.
6. I only have a few years’ experience, but I’m sure with a little training I’ll be a great asset.

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Quantifiers Part 2: Much | Many | Not Much | Not Many 3 years 3 months ago #7488

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Learn how to use the following quantifiers: much / many / not much / not many

Much and many are mainly used in interrogative and negative sentences.
e.g. How many dogs do you have?
e.g. How much honey do you want?
e.g. He doesn't have many opportunities.

Much/not much - used with non-countable nouns (always in the singular)
e.g. How much milk would you like? / I have too much milk. / I don’t like much milk.

Many/not many - used with countable nouns (always in the plural)
e.g. How many cars do you have? I don’t have many cars. / I have many cars.

Many can be used alone in affirmative sentences, but much cannot be.
Much cannot be used in affirmative sentence, instead it is replaced with a lot of or lots of
Much and many are commonly used in questions and negative statements.

Note: In spoken English, 'much', and to a lesser extent 'many', are rarely used as quantifiers in affirmative statements, unless introduced by an intensifier, such as so or too, or followed by '...of'.



Examples

1. Situation: Two friends talking about buying movie tickets.
Bob: How much money do you have?
Steve: I don’t have much. Why?
Bob: Do you have enough to buy the tickets?
Steve: How many do we need?
Bob: Not many. Three or four I think.
Steve: No problem. How much are the tickets?

2. Situation: Three friends talking about their baseball card collections.
Joe: How many cards do you have?
Grant: I don’t have many. Maybe, 500. You?
Joe: I have a lot. I guess about 700ish.
Petra: 700! Wow! And how many of them are valuable?
Grant: For me, none. Not one of my cards is valuable.
Joe: Really? I’m lucky, I guess. Many of my cards are valuable.
Petra: How much are they worth?

3. Situation: Two friends having tea.
Nick: How much milk would you like in your tea?
Tom: Not too much, thanks.
Nick: OK. And how many sugars? Oh, and how many cookies do you want?
Tom: One sugar and one cookie, please. I’m trying not to eat too much sugar these days as I’ve put on so much weight recently.


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Quantifiers Part 3: Some | Any 3 years 3 months ago #7491

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In this lesson you will learn how to use: some / any

Some is commonly used to refer to a limited supply of something; an unspecified amount or number of

Some is used in affirmative statements, but in negative and interrogative contexts it is replaced with any

As a general rule, some and any can only be used with plural countable nouns or uncountable nouns.

Examples

1. Situation: A lady is going to the shop to buy a few items and asks her coworker if she needs anything.
Kim: I’m going to the shop to buy a few things; You need anything?
Beth: (Oh) Yes, please. Can you pick me up some candy?
Kim: Yeah, of course. But what if they don’t have any?
Beth: (Ha ha) Impossible. Every convenience store has candy.

2. Situation: Two friends talking about a party.
Anna: I heard only a few people went to the party last night. Did any of your friends go?
Julia: Some of my friends went, but I didn’t speak to any of them.

3 Situation: A man is asking if the shop has white or pink shirts.
Customer: Excuse me; do you have any white or pink shirts?
Clerk: No, I’m sorry. We did have some, but we don’t have any left. We only have a few blue ones left.

4. Situation: A man is asking his friend if he can borrow some money.
Paul: I was wondering if you have any money I can borrow. I need to buy some medicine.
Ringo: Sure. How much do you need?
Paul: Just a few bucks would be great.
Ringo: No problem.

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Quantifiers Part 4: several | enough | a lot | lots of 3 years 2 months ago #7513

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In this lesson we will examine how to use the following quantifiers: several / enough / a lot / lots off

Several is used in a neutral way to suggest relatively many; more than two but not many

Enough can be used as a quantifier when it is placed before any noun, to indicate that there is much or as many as required or necessary. Enough can be used in both affirmative and negative sentences. 'Enough' is often used in questions about time and money.

A lot/lots of are used with all types of nouns, and can be used in the interrogative form and both affirmative and negative sentences.



Examples
1. He had several great job offers this week and now has a lot to think about.
2. Do we have enough milk at home?
3. He had enough money to pay his bills.
4. Not only does he make a lot of money, but his company provides several perks.
5. My previous company offered me several perks, but the salary was not enough to live on.
6. There are several people applying for the job.
7. Do we have enough gas in the car?
8. We have a lot of bread at home.
9. There are several pieces of pizza left; would you like one?
10. I don't have enough money to go out.
11. She has a lot of friends.
12. He hasseveral friends.

13. Situation: The host of a party is checking their guest has enough food.
Host: Do you have enough food or would you like some more potatoes?
Guest: Oh, I’m fine. You've really given me a lot of food; I’m pretty sure it’ll be enough.
Host: Great. If you need anything else, just ask.
Guest: Actually, I would love some ketchup, if you have any.

14. Situation: A husband and wife discussing grocery shopping.
Shane: It’s my turn to go grocery shopping. Can I get some money off you, please?
Sara: Of course. Here’s $100, I think it should be enough.
Shane: Really? We need to buy a lot this week, since we didn’t shop last week.
Sara: Oh, right, OK. Here’s another $50.
Shane: Thanks. That should be enough.
Sara: I hope so. We’re not made of money.

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