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TOPIC: Real English Grammar in Use: Grammar Rules Textbooks Don't Teach

영어 문법 수업 : Using the suffix –holic to create your own words 3 years 2 weeks ago #7560

  • Chuck OysterCafe
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Using the suffix –holic to create your own words!

In casual English, you can invent new nouns using the suffix -aholic, -oholic or –holic These new words are commonly used to mean an obsession or addiction to something, though usually in a humorous or fun manner

-holic/aholic/oholic (suffix): used with nouns and verbs to form nouns describing someone who likes something a lot or who is unable to refrain from doing something

Tip: One way to remember -oholic, aholic, and -holic is to remember the word (alc)oholic.

Examples

1. Ben is a shopaholic. (i.e. Ben is someone who loves shopping.)
2. Harry is gymaholic. (i.e. Harry likes the gym a lot.)
3. My mother is a chocaholic/chocoholic. (i.e. My mom loves to eat chocolate.)
4. My sister is a shoeaholic.
5. Sadly, he is an alcoholic.
6. I am a sugarholic.
7. I know you a foodoholic, but can you stop eating and listen to me?
8. That guy is such a workaholic; he needs to take a vacation.

We hope you are a studyaholic – at least where English is concerned. We will see you in the next post. Have a great day!

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Using a double negative - Ain't no stopping you! 2 years 2 weeks ago #7598

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Real Grammar in Use: Double negatives

As you know, there are two types of grammar - prescriptive grammar (what the textbook says is correct in formal written English) and descriptive grammar (the way native English-speakers actually use English in various contexts).

In this lesson we are going to learn how to use a double negative.

What is a double negative? A double negative is a construction occurring when two forms of grammatical negation are used in the same sentence.

In English, many teachers will tell you not to use a double negative. Well, we are here to say that you can - especially in informal contexts, poetry, and song lyrics.

The two main things to remember are these:

1. Try not to use double negatives in formal writing,
2. Since double negatives can be confusing, don’t use them when you are trying to be very clear or exact.

Examples:

We don't need no education - "Another Brick in the Wall, Part 2," Pink Floyd

I can't get no satisfaction - "Satisfaction," The Rolling Stones

Ain't no sunshine when she's gone – “Ain't No Sunshine," Bill Withers

Ain't nothin' but a "G" thang, baby! – “Nuthin' but a 'G' Thang," Dr. Dre

You ain't nothing but a hound dog – “You ain't nothing but a hound dog’” Big Mama Thornton

Ain't no mountain high enough - "Ain't No Mountain High Enough," Marvin Gaye and Tammi Terrell

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