Welcome, Guest
Username: Password:
  • Page:
  • 1

TOPIC: Common English Text, Internet, and SNS Acronyms | 영어로 사용하는 SNS 약어 총 정리!

Common English Text, Internet, and SNS Acronyms | 영어로 사용하는 SNS 약어 총 정리! 1 year 11 months ago #7608

  • Chuck OysterCafe
  • Chuck OysterCafe's Avatar Topic Author
  • Offline
  • Administrator
  • Administrator
  • Posts: 177
  • Karma: 1
  • Thank you received: 1
In these lessons, you will learn many of the most common English acronyms and abbreviations used in text and on SNS sites.

1. lol = laugh out loud
* You can use ‘lol’ when you find something funny. For example, if someone sends you a funny meme or a funny picture, you can reply with ‘lol’.
-
2. brb = (I will) be right back
* You can use ‘brb’ when you need to stop messaging for a while (due to a more important issue) to inform the person you are texting that you intend to come back and reply soon. Using ‘brb’ is often used to be polite and to show that you have not ghosted.
-
3. imo = in my opinion
* Use ‘imo’ when you are stating your opinion on something. ‘Imo’ is generally used when stating something negative (e.g. That movie was terrible, imo.), but it can also be used to state a positive or counter opinion (e.g. Are you serious? The movie was fantastic! Imo)
-
4. imho = in my humble opinion
* Use ‘imho’ when you are stating your opinion on something, but when you either want to be humble – or when you want to be ironic. ‘Imho’ is generally used when stating something negative or controversial.
-
5. cul = see you later
* Use ‘cul’ at the end of a conversation or when you have just made a plan to meet the person later in the day (e.g. Have a great day and cul).
-
Vocabulary
-
ghost (v. informal): to leave a text conversation without notice; to vanish
state an opinion (exp.): to say what you think; to give an opinion
humble (adj.): a modest view of one’s importance
text (v.): to send a message on the phone
ironic (adj.): the opposite to what is literally said
counter (adj.): the opposite or opposing (viewpoint or opinion)
generally (adv.): in most cases

Please Log in to join the conversation.

Last edit: by Chuck OysterCafe.

Common English Text, Internet, and SNS Acronyms | 영어로 사용하는 SNS 약어 총 정리! 1 year 11 months ago #7609

  • Chuck OysterCafe
  • Chuck OysterCafe's Avatar Topic Author
  • Offline
  • Administrator
  • Administrator
  • Posts: 177
  • Karma: 1
  • Thank you received: 1
In this lesson, you will learn 5 more common English acronyms.

1. NTMU / ntmu = nice to meet you
* Use ‘ntmu’ when you meet someone via text message or SNS in informal situations. Do not use this acronym in formal situations.
-
2. LMAO / lmao = laughing my ass off
* Use ‘LMAO’ or ‘lmao’ when someone has shared a funny story, meme, picture, or joke etc. ‘LMAO’ can be used when something is really funny, and when ‘lol’ is not strong enough.
-
3. ASAP / asap = as soon as possible
* Use ‘ASAP/asap’ hen you need someone to do something quickly. (e.g. Can you let me know if we are goiong to the movie asap! I need to buy the tickets if we are.)

4. FYI / fyi = for your information
* ‘FYI’ is sometimes used in business emails to mean ‘for your information’. This acronym can also be used in informal situations. ‘FYI’ is often used to make jokes (e.g. My pizza is the best in the word, FYI!) or to simply provide your friends with information they may need (e.g. Just an FYI – I am running late, sorry.).
-
5. TTFN / ttfn = ta-ta for now; bye
* You can use ‘TTFN / ttfn’ as a casual goodbye. It is similar to ‘cul’ (see you later).

Please Log in to join the conversation.

Last edit: by Chuck OysterCafe.

Common English Text, Internet, and SNS Acronyms | 영어로 사용하는 SNS 약어 총 정리! 1 year 6 months ago #7644

  • Chuck OysterCafe
  • Chuck OysterCafe's Avatar Topic Author
  • Offline
  • Administrator
  • Administrator
  • Posts: 177
  • Karma: 1
  • Thank you received: 1
Remember, acronyms and abbreviations are used to make texting and sending messages easier – especially when you have word or character limitations. In this lesson, you will learn 5 more English acronyms you can use for SNS, replying to posts, and when writing informal messages.

1. TBH = To be honest
* ‘TBH’ is generally used to tell someone you are being honest with them. It is often used when you either don’t know something (e.g. I don’t know when the movie starts, TBH.) or when you are giving negative feedback (e.g. TBH, that movie sort of sucked!)
You can use TBH/tbh when you are a) stating your opinion, or b) when you are genuinely being honest with someone about something. TBH is commonly used when saying something negative, but not always.
Examples
1. I didn’t like that movie, tbh.
2. TBH, that café you took me to sorta sucked.
3. I really want to come, but thb I have a lot of work to do tonight.

2. BTW / btw = by the way
You can use BTW when you have forgotten to mention something, or when you are just mentioning something unimportant.
Examples
1. I saw Bill yesterday, btw.
2. BTW, what time are we meeting tomorrow?
3. Oh btw, I forgot to tell you I am having a party tomorrow – come along!

3. IDK = I don’t know
* ‘IDK’ is used when you don’t know something. So, if someone asks you a question you do not know the answer to, just reply with ‘IDK’. IDK is often used as a response to a question.
Examples
1.
Ben: What time is the movie tomorrow?
Jerry: IDK, want me to find out?
2.
Ross: Did Korea win the game last night?
Jennifer: idk – why? Didn’t you watch it?

4. OMG = Oh my God!
* ‘OMG’ is used to show shock (e.g. You broke up with Jimmy? OMG!). OMG can be used in both positive and negative situations.
Examples
1. OMG! Did you hear Ben got married?
2. You got fired? OMG! Why?
3. OMG! OMG! OMG! I just saw a huge snake in my bathtub.

5. TTYL = Talk to you later
* ‘TTYL’ is similar to ‘CUL’ (See you later). You can use ‘TTYL’ if you have arranged to meet or call the person in the near future. It can also be used to simply say ‘goodbye’.
Examples
1. Dude, I gotta jet – ttyl!
2. TTYL, I have to get back to work.
3. ttyl, I’m at the gym

Vocabulary

suck (v. informal): very bad or unpleasant
negative (adj.): not positive; bad
feedback (n.): reaction to a product, message, or information
arrange (v.): plan to do; make an appointment
shock (n.): a response to a sudden and unexpected event
get fired (v.): to lose one’s job (often for doing something wrong)
got to jet (idiom slang): must leave in a hurry

Note: When you are texting or messaging friends, the prescriptive rules of grammar don’t usually apply. Check out the above examples and you will notice that the grammar is more descriptive (i.e. how people actually speak or write in a certain context). To learn more about descriptive and prescriptive grammar please check out these Real English Grammar in Use.

Please Log in to join the conversation.

  • Page:
  • 1
Time to create page: 0.116 seconds
Powered by Kunena Forum